Daniel Wageman with trophies

Daniel Wageman

The EngineLab system allows us to do things otherwise nearly impossible with our cars. Not only is the system responsible for the core control of our highly modified engine setup, but also for all auxiliary functionality such as drive by wire, pneumatic shifting, automated clutch control, dual stage injection, active drag reduction, data logging, and two way telemetry. Having used 'fixed function' systems previously, these auxiliary features would have required additional, separate controllers, development of robust communication between them, and drastically increased debugging time. Instead, all features are unified, sharing all necessary data, and packaged into a single, lightweight, rugged system. The system is so flexible that we also use it as the supervisory controller for our electric car. Thus two very different cars are able to share identical hardware and interfaces, greatly reducing the learning curve and speeding the debugging process. Anything from a minor parameter tweak to a completely new control function can (and have been) implemented in the field, even mid-starting grid.

Daniel Wageman
Technical Director
University of Washington FSAE

EngineLab
2017-11-03T20:56:23+00:00

Daniel Wageman
Technical Director
University of Washington FSAE

Daniel Wageman with trophies
The EngineLab system allows us to do things otherwise nearly impossible with our cars. Not only is the system responsible for the core control of our highly modified engine setup, but also for all auxiliary functionality such as drive by wire, pneumatic shifting, automated clutch control, dual stage injection, active drag reduction, data logging, and two way telemetry. Having used 'fixed function' systems previously, these auxiliary features would have required additional, separate controllers, development of robust communication between them, and drastically increased debugging time. Instead, all features are unified, sharing all necessary data, and packaged into a single, lightweight, rugged system. The system is so flexible that we also use it as the supervisory controller for our electric car. Thus two very different cars are able to share identical hardware and interfaces, greatly reducing the learning curve and speeding the debugging process. Anything from a minor parameter tweak to a completely new control function can (and have been) implemented in the field, even mid-starting grid.